Jacobite weapons and a vanished island

Dunlichity is a Parish church. There was an older building dating back to the 16th century but the faithful have worshipped here for much longer. The close-by loch and its fishing right belonged to the church. It is called Loch a’Chlachain, the lake of the church.

Graveyards of Scotland Dunlichity swords Jacobite hermit

Very still with a very remote feel to it, it was indeed once home of John the Hermit. King William the Lion had given the small lake (at that time called Lunnin) to John on his first visit to the area in the 12th century. According to the charter there had been a small island on the lake once. It is no more.

Dunlichity graveyard is just a short walk away from the Loch and the burial-place for the clans and septs of the area.

 Dunlichitry is a Parish church. There was an older building here since the 16th century. The close-by loch and its fishing right belonged to the church. It is named Loch a’Chlacahin, the lake of the church. This is a burial place for many clans of the area, the MacGillivrays, the MacPhails, the clan Chattan. Moss and lichen have turned some of the stones into the colours of the royal standard, yellow and red. The walls in the graveyard have allegedly been used by Highlanders in 1745 on their way to Culloden to sharpen their swords. Rather unlikely that they had left for battle without doing so before they were well on their way though. The old watch-house is still in very good condition. In the infamous days of the body-snatchers there would have been guards watching during the night to make sure none of the newly buried corpses were doug out again and sold to medicals staff at universities nearby. The building consists of two apartments, with a loft overhead in which were stored various pieces of furniture required for the open air communion. The night watchers were plentifully supplied with fuel and refreshments, so that their duty was regarded as of a sociable and even convivial character. In those times, the meal mill close by was often set a-working at the dead hours of night to grind malt for illicit distillation, and many are the legends that tell of the artifices employed to smuggle into the burgh town as much of the whisky as was not required for home consumption.

Moss and lichen have turned some of the stones into colourful reminders of the dead.

 Dunlichitry is a Parish church. There was an older building here since the 16th century. The close-by loch and its fishing right belonged to the church. It is named Loch a’Chlacahin, the lake of the church. This is a burial place for many clans of the area, the MacGillivrays, the MacPhails, the clan Chattan. Moss and lichen have turned some of the stones into the colours of the royal standard, yellow and red. The walls in the graveyard have allegedly been used by Highlanders in 1745 on their way to Culloden to sharpen their swords. Rather unlikely that they had left for battle without doing so before they were well on their way though. The old watch-house is still in very good condition. In the infamous days of the body-snatchers there would have been guards watching during the night to make sure none of the newly buried corpses were doug out again and sold to medicals staff at universities nearby. The building consists of two apartments, with a loft overhead in which were stored various pieces of furniture required for the open air communion. The night watchers were plentifully supplied with fuel and refreshments, so that their duty was regarded as of a sociable and even convivial character. In those times, the meal mill close by was often set a-working at the dead hours of night to grind malt for illicit distillation, and many are the legends that tell of the artifices employed to smuggle into the burgh town as much of the whisky as was not required for home consumption.

The walls in the graveyard have allegedly been used by Highlanders on their way to Culloden to sharpen their swords. Not unlikely, they had campaigned for a long time and their weapons probably needed attention. But of course any marks on the stones could be of different origin.

But the sword marks are not the only Jacobite connection in Dunlichity graveyard.

It is said that in 1746, when the Highlanders under Prince Charles found themselves at a loss for balls, they meditated a resurrection of the chiefs and their ladies, with the view of converting the leaden coffins into bullets. (1)

The clan chiefs and their ladies had been buried in coffins made of lead as was the custom in those days. Many chiefs and their ladies were laid to rest within the enclosure.

Dunlichity that is the hill which is in the middle of and bisects the territory of the Caiti. The descendants of this ancient, numerous, and warlike people, under the various appellations of Mackintosh, Macgillivray, Macbean, Macqueen, Shaw, Macphail, Smith or Gow, Davidson, Clark, and others, who are all followers of Mackintosh of Mackintosh as their chief, and Captain of Clanchattan. (1)

The old watch-house is still in very good condition. In the infamous days of the body-snatchers there would have been guards watching during the night to make sure none of the newly buried corpses (that were not safely interred within lead coffins) were doug out again and sold to medicals staff at universities nearby.

marks of Jaconbite swords graveyards of scotland dunlichityThe building consists of two apartments, with a loft overhead in which were stored various pieces of furniture required for the open air communion. The night watchers were plentifully supplied with fuel and refreshments, so that their duty was regarded as of a sociable and even convivial character. In those times, the meal mill close by was often set a-working at the dead hours of night to grind malt for illicit distillation, and many are the legends that tell of the artifices employed to smuggle into the burgh town as much of the whisky as was not required for home consumption. (2)

sources and further reading:

The New Statistical Account of Scotland. William Blackwood & Son, Edinburgh, London, 1845 (1)

Tales from Loch Ness’ East (2)

Canmore Loch a’Chlachain

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