a leper colony in the tropics and a war in Africa

Preview in new tab Aberlady's history Aberlady goes back a long way. There are no signs of any Roman setlements. However, it appears that there was an Iron Age settlement taking advantage of the sheltered coastal location provided by the bay. Aberlady also has a long history of smuggling. Archaeological findings support the theory that... Continue Reading →

death to the princess and her unborn child

Many cruel and misogynist tale has been told from the past ages. The story of Theneu seems particularly cruel. A father trying to kill his pregnant daughter. He fails, tries another way and she ends up giving birth alone on a boat in the North Sea. Usually, the story focuses either o the father, because he was Loth, a powerful king. Or on the son she bore, who became a famous saint: St Kentigern of Glasgow.

the disappearance of the last baronet

the issue with the issue The descendants of Sir James continued to possess property in the area for centuries but by the 19th century the family was entirely extinct in the male line. This was even more remarkable, as Sir Michael lived to see 300 of his own issue, while Sir Andrew, his youngest son, saw 600 descendants from his father. In the aisle of the old church of Abdie, there are mural tablets, erected to the memory of Sir James Balfour, and his father Sir Michael; and here, or in the adjoining churchyard, they were both interred.

The Mason’s Mausoleum

The austere pyramid is an unusual sight and certainly an uncommon style for am mausoleum in Scotland. The reason being not an architectural fancy or fashion but the stong faith of its creator - Francis Wemyss Charteris was a Freemason The mausoleum was built between 1795 and 1798. Thomas Harrison of Lancaster assisted. It was a precicely thought through built. The look of simplicity is devceiving, there is more to it than meets the eye. Tributes have been paid to Masonic symbology, numerology and geometry. Here are just a few examples.

three bones taken from a grave

This a well known Gaelic love charm, mostly scribed to Blind Allan, the Glengarry bard. The translation is taken from JG Campbell. It is a recipe how to gain the love of a man and it has to be performed on a Wednesday on a broad level flagstone with a wooden shovel on your shoulders. For the love of the man you like - ach gràdh an fhir thig riut.

burial place of the drowned

The sea has taken lives all around Scotland and many bodies have been washed on her shores over the centuries. This is a burial ground that takes its origin in lives lost at sea, situated closely to the dazzling and deadly blue waves of Scotland's shores.

Victorians in Strathpeffer

Quite apart from the throbbing life of Strathpeffer lies Kinettas graveyard, an old burial ground on the fringe of town. There must have been a church here at one time, but no traces remain. It was probably one of the Culdee order, an old Celtic order that slowly disappeared as orders from the continent were introduced into Scotland. But there is no documentation to prove that theory to be correct.

the witches of Dirleton

Dirleton can claim to be one of the most beautiful villages in Scotland, and in fact, visiting this wee beauty you might start to wonder how you ended up in a Scottish episode of Midsomer Murders. Gardens are blooming everywhere, little houses are well-kept and people live happily ever after. Murders exist on TV only, in Midsomer Somewhere. Think again again, Dirleton has murder connections of its own....

Funny Scottish epitaphs – the mason

headstone of James Humphrey (1755 - 1844) Below thir stanes lie Jamie's banes' O Death, It's my opinion, Thou ne'er took such bleth'ran bitch Into thy dark dominian. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Edinburgh, Chambers, 1990

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑