strange sounds at night

The Gaelic tradition knows many paranormal phenomena in the twilight world of myths, beliefs and superstitions; it isn't even necessary to visit a graveyard to witness them. One of the many strange und seemingly inexplicable things that can happen in this world is a strange and unexplained crying heard before an extraordinary death occurs. This... Continue Reading →

mistress for a lifetime

One of the things that can be pondered on best in a graveyard is time. A lifetime. In case of the beautiful sounding village of Kirkton of Kingoldrum, the life and faith of Marion Ogilvie comes to mind. She lived just south of the village in Balfour Castle. Or maybe she didn’t and the tower... Continue Reading →

Funny Scottish Epitaph: Oakfield Chopper

The Lord saw good, I was looping off wood And down fell from the tree. I met with check and broke my neck, And so death lopped off me. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1990

The archer’s child

Templewood, also known as Half Moon Wood, is an extraordinary graveyard. An ancient burial site, different graves all around, a truly stunning place in Kilmartin in Argyll, a valley full of history, traces of wich still clearly recognizable. People have lived here for 5000 years and you have to think back around 170 generations to... Continue Reading →

Lochcarron and a bloody feud

Donald MacDonald was the 8th of Glengarry and his reign was turbulent and memorable for many reasons, one was violence. A feud was raging between his family and the MacKenzies, a feud that had originated over a quarrel about property in Lochcarron. Blood was spilled, cattle was raided, and property destroyed. One of the MacDonalds,... Continue Reading →

Garyvard cemetery, Isle of Lewis

Gearraidh means fertile land and Gearraidh a’ Bhàird (Garyvard) suggests it could be the fertile land of the bard. Whereas on the shore the place name is Gaelic in origin the sea loch isn’t. Loch Erisort is derived from the Old Norse Eiríksfjorðr (Eric's fjord). Just looking at the graveyard of the small settlement outside... Continue Reading →

Seanachie

Anyone interested in Scottish history and culture will at some point come across the seanachie, the Gaelic teller of old tales. Gaelic culture was very much an oral one and a Seanachie in those days had the responsibility to tell the tales of a clan or noble family as a keeper of history and traditions.... Continue Reading →

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