black monks

The original Celtic church had no organization, as the new Church of Rome gained in influence, things changed in Scotland. The medieval church saw much innovation. With the beginning of the 12th century influences from abroad began to shape its structure. The Celtic monks disappeared, the Benedictine monks gained influence. The Culdees were the last... Continue Reading →

on a winter’s day

Sometimes Scotland overwhelms you with an incredible infusion of light, especially in winter when the days are short and the sun is a rare event in grey times. Light that sparks the joy of being. Just like that. Even on a graveyard. Daviot church on an afternoon in January can be breathtaking, in any other... Continue Reading →

bullets, burnings and bread

There are three holes in the gravestone of Donald Fraser of Erchite, remains of a funeral that ended in a shooting, the holes are the marks the bullets left. It must have been the second half of the year 1745. The tragic battle of Culloden had left its mark on Scotland and indeed the area... Continue Reading →

historic murder comic

There are many Pictish stones in Moray, most of them stand lonely in some field or other somewhere along the roadside, often fenced-in with a small sign giving a few an explanations. They usually do not differ very much to the untrained eye, prior knowledge of Pictish symbolism often helps. The Sueno stone is an... Continue Reading →

stones for Cromwell’s citadel

There are more than enough romantic ruins in Moray but Kinloss is a special one as it was not only one of the greatest religious powerhouses of its time, it was also home to an interesting business idea. The three key words are Cistercians, Reformation and Cromwell. Founded in 1150 by the saintly King David... Continue Reading →

Clava Cairns

This is certainly one of the oldest cemeteries in Scotland. People buried their dead here for 4000 years and the markers of these tombs remain to this day, like headstones on a contemporary cemetery. A reminder of a distant and little known past. sacred site These Bronze Age graves near Inverness are amongst the best... Continue Reading →

graves of the unwanted

Craig Dunain, old lunatic asylum Inverness Do places keep a sense of pain, a sense of the fear and anger that was once felt there? Can fear linger in stone and wood? Can a house keep the horror that once was felt there?   Does an abandoned lunatic asylum still hold some sense of insanity?... Continue Reading →

death’s orchard

St. Mary’s Chapel  yard in Inverness, an ancient burial ground right in the heart of the Highland’s capital, is but rarely visited, being somehow hidden behind high walls. Chapel Yard is one of three ancient burial grounds in Inverness and probably dates back as far as 1233. In the early days two churches with the... Continue Reading →

Fort George

Cold, red sandstone against the pale blue water of the Moray Firth: Fort George. Mighty resting place, where the walls tower massively over a vast star-shaped ground. At the back of the promontory, close to the sea, is the garrison’s chapel. It commemorates the dead of the past as well as the present.   Fort... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑