graves of the unwanted

Craig Dunain, old lunatic asylum Inverness Do places keep a sense of pain, a sense of the fear and anger that was once felt there? Can fear linger in stone and wood? Can a house keep the horror that once was felt there?   Does an abandoned lunatic asylum still hold some sense of insanity?... Continue Reading →

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death’s orchard

St. Mary’s Chapel  yard in Inverness, an ancient burial ground right in the heart of the Highland’s capital, is but rarely visited, being somehow hidden behind high walls. Chapel Yard is one of three ancient burial grounds in Inverness and probably dates back as far as 1233. In the early days two churches with the... Continue Reading →

Fort George

Cold, red sandstone against the pale blue water of the Moray Firth: Fort George. Mighty resting place, where the walls tower massively over a vast star-shaped ground. At the back of the promontory, close to the sea, is the garrison’s chapel. It commemorates the dead of the past as well as the present.   Fort... Continue Reading →

running with the coffin

Funeral rites are sombre, grave and placid; at least in most European countries they are. Scotland can be a very different matter when it comes to burying the dead. Funerals are sometimes full of humour, drink and the sharing of reminiscences with a smile. In Petty, just about 7 miles outside Inverness, the mourners would... Continue Reading →

fairy hill

Entering Inverness from the South, the traveller passes a small, wooded hill with a peculiar shape that rises steep behind the Caledonian Canal: Tomnahurich. A large burial ground with old graves on the hill and newer ones circling it. Nothing spectacular seems to hide behind the high gates of Tomnahurich. For those who do not... Continue Reading →

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