Fatal Glen Nevis

The list is long. So many have died in this area. They perished hiking, driving, training. They died on Ben Nevis, in Glen Nevis and in the surrounding area. They died rock climbing, in avalanches, falling from ridges, crashing into mountains with planes, they were struck by lightning, they drowned, they were killed by explosions. Some of those are buried in Glen Nevis cemetery opposite the Glen Nevis Visitors Center. Helicopters and mountain range rescue teams are operating all year round.

killed by his own clan

This is a beautiful story of family, power and death and as so many Scottish clan stories, it does not come with a happy ending. the young pretender There was once a young man, the youngest son of Allan MacDonald, 4th Chief of Clanranald, who died in 1505. His name was Ranald and he was... Continue Reading →

the Burns connection

The Church of Crosbie has a very special connection with the poet Robert Burns. Its roof collapsed on the stormy January night of 1759, in which the poet was born. Crosbie is just under 40 miles away from Alloway. The ruin was never rebuilt and has now been made inaccessible. Unfortunately, the entire cemetery is... Continue Reading →

gallow’s hill

Sometimes clues to the past lie within the place names. That is especially true for Scotland where the Gaels were very descriptive in their naming of landscape as well as man-made places. A map often tells you many things about a place before you even visit. It is down to the proper translation though, to... Continue Reading →

strange sounds at night

The Gaelic tradition knows many paranormal phenomena in the twilight world of myths, beliefs and superstitions; it isn't even necessary to visit a graveyard to witness them. One of the many strange und seemingly inexplicable things that can happen in this world is a strange and unexplained crying heard before an extraordinary death occurs. This... Continue Reading →

Celtic Christianity

The Old Church of Bona in Kirkton, south of Inverness. A much older church once stood here, no traces are left. The existing church is now used as a private residence. The burial ground is known as Cladh Uradain and is at least 300 years old. It is still in use today. Here was the... Continue Reading →

wisdom, wit, and common sense

Portree used to be called Kiltaraglen, named after an old chapel dedicated to Talorgan or Talarican, a Culdee monk of distinction. The Loch was called Saint Columba’s Loch. This all changed when King James V landed here in 1540. The place and the loch were now port-an-righ, the King’s landing place.   About two hundred... Continue Reading →

a sight of beauty and joy

A place as breathtaking as Bosta Beach on the island of Great Bernera, looking towards the small islands and Little Bernera. The sun, the sea, and the cry of seagulls in the wind. Whites, greens and pinks in warm summer sands, the waves peaceful tidings of an unknown future. To bury the dead in a... Continue Reading →

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