Biggar Chatty Lady

On a cold pillow lies her head Yet it will rise again ‘tis said; So prudently reader how thy walk For if she rise again she’ll talk! Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Edinburgh, Chambers; 1990  

Advertisements

Rhynie’s Gothic grave and sarcophagus

Rhynie is first and foremost known for its Pictish symbol stones, on display next to the graveyard in the adjacent car park under an open wooden construction. The graveyard itself is old, too. The place-name Rhynie or sometimes also spelled Rhyny derives either from the French word roinneau, meaning a small promontory or from the word rig, meaning... Continue Reading →

a final moan from the grave

Alexander Grant (Alasdair Mac Iain Bhain) was a poet and a soldier. He grew up near Invermoriston in the small and remote village of Achnaconeran (Achadh nan Conbhairean) to the west of Loch Ness, to be a gifted man of sensitivity and strength, a man of thought as well as action, a bard and a... Continue Reading →

careless early death

The drowning of a young shepherd and his brother at Gripdyke, Lochlee. The first body to be interred in the graveyard of the new church of Lochlee was the Rev Inglis‘ mother in 1808. Many deaths followed, a few still very vividly remembered in the area for their futility and tragic circumstances. It is always... Continue Reading →

John Sim of Peterhead

What lies here? John Sim, ye needna‘ speir. Hullo John, is that you? Ay, ay, but I’m deid noo. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Edinburgh, Chambers; 1990

Banchory, N Kincardineshire

John Gray, Messenger-at-Arms, died 1806, wrote this himself: Poor John Gray! Here he lies, Nobody laughs and nobody cries; Where he’s gone, and how he fares, Nobody knows and nobody cares. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Edinburgh, Chambers; 1990

grave loss

Strontian, Ardnamurchan, the Parish church built in the 1820s by Thomas Telford, one of 32 churches built in thinly populated areas, but there is more to be found on this graveyard. The gravestone of Roderick and Mary Gordon and their sons Adam and James sits here, quietly telling a sad story. The Gordon family lived... Continue Reading →

happiness doesn’t need a funeral

S coma nair no àit' ar n-eung dhuinn 'S greadhnachas gun fheum ar tòrraidh.   The time or place of our death doesn' t matter, since happiness doesn' t need a funeral.   Bàrdachd Mhgr. Ailein. The Gaelic Poems of Fr Allan MacDonald. Transcribed, translated and published by John Lorne Campbell; 1965

Greyfriars Kirkyard, Edinburgh

Here snug in a grave my wife doth lie, She is at rest, and so am I, Who for beneath this stone doth rest Has joined the army oft he blest. The lord has taken her to the sky; The Saints rejoice, and so do I Tears cannot restore her, therefore I cry. Raymond Lamont-Brown:... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑