cold childhood

This church, as probably many others all over the country, has seen decisive events in the history of this nation. A king was crowned within these walls when he was just over a year old; a baby still. The Protestant Church of the Holy Rude (founded at 1129) was the stage where the son of... Continue Reading →

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St Andrews – Scotland, Saint and Saltire

St Andrews – Scotland, Saint and Saltire St Andrews is the heart of Scotland in many ways. One reason is its name, taken from the patron saint of Scotland who is said to be buried here. “St Andrew has been celebrated in Scotland for over a thousand years, with feasts being held in his honour as... Continue Reading →

Torryburn, Fife

In this churchyard lies Eppie Coutts, Either here, or hereabouts: But where it is, none can tell Till Eppie rise and tell hersel'. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers; Edinburgh, 1990

Aberdeen

Here lies Martin Elginbrod, Have mercy on my soul, Lord God, As I would do were I Lord God, And Thou were Martin Elginbrod. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers; Edinburgh, 1990

walking over someone’s grave

A shudder, a draft, cold sweat, a hunch of death, a tickling of the spine - the feeling that someone is walking over ones grave. A familiar sensation to many of us. As is the phrase. "Someone walked over my grave!" My grave? A definite point on the map of time? The final grid? My... Continue Reading →

the lion’s rest

A royal burial is a rare and special event in the history of a nation, a political cut after which a new chapter of history needs to be written. That goes without a doubt for most kings, not only the Scottish ones. Royal graves therefore seem of special importance, because they symbolise so much more... Continue Reading →

common denominator

Truth is eternal. Death is the last truth. The end of every man’s life is the common denominator. We all share and face eventually one truth: death. Man’s longing for individuality and uniqueness on the other hand generate a need to differ, even in death. Graveyards are in most Middle European cultures a very diverse... Continue Reading →

crosses

The cross might have been the very first symbol man used. A line and another line crossing it – a saltire (the Scottish flag to this day); like a cross to mark a spot or to draw attention to something. The cross must have been the first stage of written communication man has developed. A... Continue Reading →

the turf of St. Mary’s

The Isle of Skye, Scotland’s beautiful wild island, where the majestic Cuillins loom and where the old tell tales of days long gone. An ancient place, mythical and magic. The northern, windswept part of the island is called Trotternish, a place-name that tells of Norse invasions long before our time. The village of Dunvegan is... Continue Reading →

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