ancient burials

Sunhoney Stone Circle Stone circles, intriguing markers of a civilization gone for thousands of years. Little is known of their customs and beliefs. What remains are the intriguing circular arrangements – a considerable number along the River Dee. Sunhoney is one of about a hundred in Aberdeenshire, just above the Sunhoney Farmhouse. Its beauty lies... Continue Reading →

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keeping corpses safe

mortsafes in Logierait churchyard, Perthshire Considering things from a 21st century point of view it seems rather obvious: few things in life are as safe as a dead body. Who would want to steal a corpse? These days probably very few people. It is nothing really you can sell anywhere and where there is no... Continue Reading →

grave warren

The bass of Inverurie and Inverurie cemetery face a furry and rather cute danger – rabbits. They seem to be everywhere in this large ground between the wild banks of the river Ury and Reithhall Road.     The Norman Motte and Bailey castle that once stood here must have commanded the glen with power... Continue Reading →

Hill of blood, Dunfallandy       

Most people will travel to Dunfallandy to see the Pictish stone. But a far more bloody tale tells the burial enclosure right next to the ancient marker of the Picts. The graveyard is not signposted for it is the private burial enclosure of the Fergussons of Dunfallandy. There has been an early chapel on this... Continue Reading →

love, hate and destruction

The Wolf of Badenoch and the destruction of Elgin Cathedral History tells us many things - battles fought, lands lost or gained, it mentions titles, deeds and marriage contracts but very rarely does it tell us anything about the humans affected by those facts. When it comes to women the information gets even scarcer. Their... Continue Reading →

lost fortune, lost land, lost graves

To lose ones fortune is bitter, it happened to many. The more you have, the more you have to lose and to lose your land as well as your fortune has consequences for generations to come. Among the many things landed gentry could lose in Scotland apart from stately homes, forests, arable fields and rich... Continue Reading →

Glencalvie people the wicked generation

It is the year 1845. Leipzig celebrates the première of Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy’s Violin Concerto in E minor, the Glasgow School of Art opens its elaborate doors, “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe is published and anaesthesia is used in childbirth for the first time. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert visit Wartburg Castle in Germany.... Continue Reading →

The secret vault of the Sutherlands

Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, Duchess of Sutherland, is certainly one of the most notorious and controversial figures of Scottish history. She was incredibly rich, owned most of the county of Sutherland although she was rarely present. She was born in Edinburgh in 1765 and was buried in Dornoch Cathedral in 1839. So was her husband, who died... Continue Reading →

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