wisdom, wit, and common sense

Portree used to be called Kiltaraglen, named after an old chapel dedicated to Talorgan or Talarican, a Culdee monk of distinction. The Loch was called Saint Columba’s Loch. This all changed when King James V landed here in 1540. The place and the loch were now port-an-righ, the King’s landing place.   About two hundred... Continue Reading →

the modern twist – Knockando

Sometimes Scotland in all the glory of her tradition, misleads those who tend to romantic views. Not everything is as it seems at first sight, so beware of clichés. Sometimes Tartan is noching but a square pattern and behind what seems to be intrinsically Scottish, lies an English background. Upper Knockando graveyard is not as... Continue Reading →

buckets full of thumbs

This is Kilfinichen or Kilfinichan. Once a medieval church stood here. Now it is a private estate. It was merged with the parish of Kilvickeon, whose church was destroyed during the Reformation. The people that ruled and dominated this area on the island of Mull in the past, were the MacLeans, a very powerful clan... Continue Reading →

a sight of beauty and joy

A place as breathtaking as Bosta Beach on the island of Great Bernera, looking towards the small islands and Little Bernera. The sun, the sea, and the cry of seagulls in the wind. Whites, greens and pinks in warm summer sands, the waves peaceful tidings of an unknown future. To bury the dead in a... Continue Reading →

Chapel of Sand

Chapel of Sand or chapel of Sand of Udrigil, is an almost forgotten but somehow mystic place in Torridon, tucked away between a caravan park, a river, and the sea, close to the village of Laide. In the 18th century the chapel was still in use, then worship came to an end at the chapel... Continue Reading →

mothers and sons

Chiefs of the Clan Grant were the Lairds of Grant, who succeeded to the Earldom of Seafield and to the extensive lands of the Ogilvies, Earls of Findlater and Seafield. The coat of arms of Ogilvie Grant Earl of Seafield can be seen on the mausoleum closer to the church but not on the second... Continue Reading →

stables and steeples

Banffshire was one of the few regions in Scotland that remained Catholic after the Reformation. This also applies to the regions of Barra, South Uist and Moidart. Today, about one eighth of the Scottish population is Catholic. In most cemeteries, the separation is not really obvious, there are some, where it is and there are... Continue Reading →

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