strange sounds at night

The Gaelic tradition knows many paranormal phenomena in the twilight world of myths, beliefs and superstitions; it isn't even necessary to visit a graveyard to witness them. One of the many strange und seemingly inexplicable things that can happen in this world is a strange and unexplained crying heard before an extraordinary death occurs. This... Continue Reading →

Funny Scottish Epitaph: Oakfield Chopper

The Lord saw good, I was looping off wood And down fell from the tree. I met with check and broke my neck, And so death lopped off me. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1990

The archer’s child

Templewood, also known as Half Moon Wood, is an extraordinary graveyard. An ancient burial site, different graves all around, a truly stunning place in Kilmartin in Argyll, a valley full of history, traces of wich still clearly recognizable. People have lived here for 5000 years and you have to think back around 170 generations to... Continue Reading →

ancient gravestone

This stone marks a burial place of importance. Who the deceased was will remain unknown forever. He or she was buried about 1.500 years ago in rural Aberdeenshire. There is nothing spectacular to his place but it is remarkable in many ways. Standing stones rarely mark burial spots. Most of them have been moved to... Continue Reading →

Celtic Christianity

The Old Church of Bona in Kirkton, south of Inverness. A much older church once stood here, no traces are left. The existing church is now used as a private residence. The burial ground is known as Cladh Uradain and is at least 300 years old. It is still in use today. Here was the... Continue Reading →

wisdom, wit, and common sense

Portree used to be called Kiltaraglen, named after an old chapel dedicated to Talorgan or Talarican, a Culdee monk of distinction. The Loch was called Saint Columba’s Loch. This all changed when King James V landed here in 1540. The place and the loch were now port-an-righ, the King’s landing place.   About two hundred... Continue Reading →

loveliness, lust and loss

Rescobie is a pretty picturesque graveyard. Rescobie Loch in the distance, ancient gravestones scattered around the 19th century church building in Thomas Telford’s typical austere style. Some of the grave date back as far as the early 17th century, over 400 years have they lasted. Symbols of mortality, death and time decorate the slabs. The... Continue Reading →

Seanachie

Anyone interested in Scottish history and culture will at some point come across the seanachie, the Gaelic teller of old tales. Gaelic culture was very much an oral one and a Seanachie in those days had the responsibility to tell the tales of a clan or noble family as a keeper of history and traditions.... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑