Funny Scottish Epitaphs: The Falkirk Flirt

Here lies in peace secure A lass inclined to mirth Who by way of making sure Took her paradise on earth. Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1990

loveliness, lust and loss

Rescobie is a pretty picturesque graveyard. Rescobie Loch in the distance, ancient gravestones scattered around the 19th century church building in Thomas Telford’s typical austere style. Some of the grave date back as far as the early 17th century, over 400 years have they lasted. Symbols of mortality, death and time decorate the slabs. The... Continue Reading →

Seanachie

Anyone interested in Scottish history and culture will at some point come across the seanachie, the Gaelic teller of old tales. Gaelic culture was very much an oral one and a Seanachie in those days had the responsibility to tell the tales of a clan or noble family as a keeper of history and traditions.... Continue Reading →

a sight of beauty and joy

A place as breathtaking as Bosta Beach on the island of Great Bernera, looking towards the small islands and Little Bernera. The sun, the sea, and the cry of seagulls in the wind. Whites, greens and pinks in warm summer sands, the waves peaceful tidings of an unknown future. To bury the dead in a... Continue Reading →

Funny Scottish Epitaphs: without a sob

In hope to sing without a sob the anthem ever new, I gladly bid the dusty glob and vain delights adieu. From Strichen, Aberdeenshire Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1990    

where the devil lost a soul

This is a story of the devil hunting a soul and losing it to the sacred ground of Birnie Kirkyard. This is an ancient place, the church itself is one of the oldest in Scotland. Christians have worshipped here since the 12th century and the Celts centuries earlier. Birnie was the cathedral to the Bishop... Continue Reading →

Funny Scottish Epitaphs: The Surgeon’s Bones

A serious friend my drop a tear On these dear bones and say These once were strong as mine appear, And mine must be as they. Garrel Churchyard, Dumfries, John Henry, Surgeon, 1798 Raymond Lamont-Brown: Scottish Epitaphs. Chambers, Edinburgh, 1990

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